What You Need to Know about POP (Pelvic Organ Prolapse)

DEFY GRAVITY: 101 ON POP (PELVIC ORGAN PROLAPSE)

POP is the partial or complete loss of pelvic and vaginal support that is a result of stretching, weakening, or tearing of the connective tissue, muscles and ligaments that support the pelvic organs.

RISK FACTORS FOR POP INCLUDE:
Female gender
Pregnancy
Childbearing, Multiple deliveries
Obesity
Increasing age
Menopause
Other conditions of estrogen deprivation
Large and long standing uterine masses (e.g., fibroids)
Pelvic surgery or trauma
Prolonged repetitive heavy lifting
Chronic constipation
Chronic cough
Genetic predisposition/family history
Medical conditions including collagen disorders and diabetes

TYPES OF POP
Cystocele or “Dropped Bladder”
Rectocele or “Dropped Rectum”
Enterocele or “Dropped Intestines”
Vaginal Vault Prolapse or “Dropped End of the Vagina” in a patient that has had hysterectomy
Utero-vaginal Prolapse or “Dropped Cervix and Uterus”
Perineocele or “Ballooned Out” perineal body/bicycle seat area
A combination of some or all of the above

SYMPTOMS OF POP
Pelvic pressure/heaviness
Pelvic pain
Vaginal bulge/fullness
Incomplete emptying of the bladder/voiding difficulty
Constipation/abnormality of bowel functions
Urinary leakage/loss of bladder control
Urinary retention
Urinary frequency
Excessive vaginal discharge
Recurrent urinary tract infections
If long standing, may lead to chronic compromising of kidney function

STAGGERING POP STATISTICS!
50% (HALF!) of women by age 50 would have some degree of pelvic laxity, and may or may not be symptomatic
By age 60, 20% to 30% of these women will require surgical correction in order to restore normal physical and vaginal activity, improve exercise tolerability and overall quality of health
By age 80, 50% of women would have symptomatic POP

If you are experiencing any of these symptoms, you should contact us as soon as possible for immediate help.

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